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    Mahabalipuram

    Mahabalipuram was the earlier name of Mamallapuram, because the demon king Mahabali was killed by Lord Vishnu. The name was changed later by the king of Pallava Narashima Varman who has got the title of Mamalla \"The great wrestler.\"

    Mahabalipuram lies on the Coromandel Coast, which faces the Bay of Bengal. This is an elegant place to watch, which a well established sea port. During the 7th and 10th centuries of the Pallava dynasty, this was the second capital of the Pallavas who ruled Kanchipuram. Formerly, mahabalipuram was known and called as Mahabalipuram. The former name of this place ‘Mahabalipuram’ has a history. A very rude cruel king Mahabali reined this place and in a fierce battle king Mahabali was killed by Lord Vishnu and the place was named after the dead, arrogant kind Mahabali.

    It was during the reign of King Narasimha Varman I, the name Mahabalipuram was changed. It was renamed mahabalipuram, which is called till now. There is a story behind the name Mamallpuram king Narasimha Varman I. He was a great and valiant warrior. He was given the title Mamalla, which means ‘the great wrestler.’ So the name was converted from Mahabalipuram to mahabalipuram considering the great king and his achievements.

    After the decline of the Gupta Dynasty, the pallavas rose to the pioneer in south India. They ruled over from the 3rd century till the end of the 9th century A.D. The best period of their rule was between 650 and 750 AD and this period was called the Golden Age of the pallavas. The pallavas were very powerful. They were profound thinkers.

    It was during the rule of the pallavas, great poets, dramatists, artists, artisans, scholars and saints emerged. As one can say that the pallavas are the pioneers and forerunners of new styles both in art and architecture and mahabalipuram is the best place to praise off their skill and talent. New sculptures and unique paintings were innovative and exuberant. This place mahabalipuram itself became their exploring field and they made the best use of the resources. They game a shape and creative energy to what they imagined. It became a dream come true as it witnessed innovations in all styles.

    The richness in mahabalipuram was not known to many, as these pallavas did not outlet and expose their quality and innovative creations to the outer world for obvious reasons. The aestheticism in mahabalipuram was hidden until the late 18th century.

    what is special about mahabalipuram?
    Of course every one can point out the rock - cut caves, temples made from a single rock, temples and strives of different structures, and bas-reliefs, which are so artistic and sheer creativity. Mamallpuram is referred as an ‘open-air museum’. The great pallava kings Narasimha I and Rajasimha have well preserved these stylistic qualities that one enjoys in mahabalipuram even in the present day.

    The beauty of the place is not only due to these architecture, but the vast casuarinas trees, the silvery sandy beach the classical hand male crafts around have made them all to form what is a collective splendor. Any visitor who visits mahabalipuram will remain startled and intoxicated with the grandeur. They feel hand hearted and more out from this historical and fascinating tourist spot.

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  • Tour Packages

    Sabarimala Pilgrimage Package..

    COCHIN-ERUMELI-PAMBA-COCHIN

    Duration: 1 night - 2 days

    Seasonal Package


    Highlights: Sabarimala is a hindu pilgrimage center located in the western ghats mountain range of Pathanamthitta District, Perunad grama panchayat in Kerala. It is the largest annual pilgrimage in the world with an estimated 45–50 million devotees visiting every year.Sabarimala is believed to be the place where the Hindu God Ayyappan meditated after killing the powerful demoness, Mahishi. Ayyappan\\\'s temple is situated here amidst 18 hills. The temple is situated on a hilltop at an altitude of 468 m (1535 ft) above mean sea level, and is surrounded by mountains and dense forests. Temples exist in each of the hills surrounding Sabarimala. While functional and intact temples exist at many places in the surrounding areas like Nilackal, Kalaketi, and Karimala, remnants of old temples survive to this day on remaining hills.

    Sabarimala is linked to Hindu pilgrimage, predominantly for men of all ages. You can identify a Sabarimala pilgrim easily as they wear black, orange, or blue dress.They do not shave till the completion of pilgrimage and smear Vibhuti or Sandal paste on their forehead. Women between the ages of 10 and 50 are not allowed to enter the temple, since the story attributed to Ayyappa prohibits the entry of the women in the menstrual age group. This is because Ayyappan is a Bramachari (Celibate). The temple is open for worship only during the days of Mandalapooja (approximately November 15 to December 26), Makaravilakku (January 14- \\\"Makara Sankranti\\\") and Vishu (April 14), and the first six days of each Malayalam month.

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  • Hotels

    Hotel Turtle on the Beach

    Indulge in a stylish boutique experience at a beach destination- Kovalam, one of the best-known destinations in India, has the bohemian vibe of a beach combined with a tranquility typical of Kerala; a grand vista in a peaceful surrounds.

    The strikingly-designed Turtle on the Beach, facing Eve’s beach, captures this blend perfectly; starting with the traditional vermillion welcome as you enter. The ethos of this boutique hotel is unmistakable. The stylish, Zen-like lounge, which looks on the sea from a height, sets the stage for your stay. All the rooms here are sea-facing. Wipe the tropical humidity from your face with the cool towels provided, sit with the arty Buddhas on the wooden benches and join them in listening to the sounds of the sea.

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  • Attractions

    Ayudha Puja

    Ayudha Puja is an integral part of the Navratri festival (festival of triumph), a Hindu festival which is traditionally celebrated in India. It is also called \\\\\\\"Astra Puja\\\\\\\", the synonym for Ayudha Puja. In simple terms, it means “Worship of Implements”. It is celebrated in Karnataka (in erstwhile Mysore State) as “Ayudha Puje” (Kannada), in Kerala as Ayudha Puja (Malayalam), and in Tamil Nadu as Ayuda Pujai (Tamil) and the festival falls on the ninth day or Navami of the bright half of Moon\\\\\\\'s cycle of 15 days (as per Almanac) in the month of September/October, and is popularly a part of the Dasara or Navaratri or Durga Puja or Golu festival. On the ninth day of the Dasara festival, weapons and tools are worshipped. In Karnataka, the celebration is for killing of the demon king Mahishasura by goddess Chamundeshwari. After slaying of the demon king, the weapons were kept out for worship. While Navaratri festival is observed all over the country, but in South Indian states, where it is widely celebrated as Ayudha Puja. There are slight variations of worship procedure.

    The principal Shakti goddesses worshipped during the Ayudha puja are Saraswati (the Goddess of wisdom, arts and literature), Lakshmi (the goddess of wealth) and Parvati (the divine mother), apart from various types of equipment. It is on this occasion when weapons are worshipped by soldiers and tools are revered by artisans. The Puja is considered a meaningful custom, which focuses specific attention to one’s profession and its related tools and connotes that a divine force is working behind it to perform well and for getting the proper reward.

    In the cross cultural development that has revolutionized the society, with modern science making a lasting impact on the scientific knowledge and industrial base in India. The ethos of the old religious order is retained by worship of computers and typewriters also during the Ayudha Puja, in the same manner as practised in the past for weapons of warfare.

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